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HOW STRUCTURE AFFECTS MOVEMENT

Page 9

More Severe Problems
"Terrier" Fronted

  • This dog has a short upper arm, but his shoulderblade is well laid back and of correct length. He is what is termed a Terrier Front.
  • His second thigh is long
  • He will reach well forward as the angle of his shoulderblade is correct but he will lift in the front due to his shorter upper arm and his long second thigh.
  • His timing will be uncoordinated as his front feet will take longer to strike the ground than his rear feet and his rear will lack drive.
  • He can look to be light on his feet and "Hover" as his front legs try to coordinate with his rear.
  • He will have a slight pause before his front feet hit the ground to allow for his rear.
Longer legs

  • This dog's front legs and rear pasterns are too long.
  • He looks to be stylish and more elegant, but he is off type and out of balance.
  • His long front legs make his body look "off square" and his back over-short.





Overdone

  • This dog's front legs are too short.
  • He has "Leg-O-Mutton" hindquarters an over-developed first thigh and a narrow second thigh.
  • His short front legs make his body look "off square" as his length looks longer than his height due to his heavier front.
  • He looks strong and powerful but he is off type. (More common in Europe)
  • Those overdeveloped hindquarters gives the dog a "squatting look".
  • He will cover ground because of his angulation but his hind legs will not have the same drive as a dog with stronger second thigh
  • He may lift and have a rotary action in the rear to allow for his exceptional forward reach.
Short shoulderblade and upper arm

  • This dog's shoulderblade and upper arm are shorter and straighter.
  • His rear is strong but he is out of balance.
  • This dog will lift his front feet when moving to compensate for his strong driving rear using a semi-hackney gait.
  • He will be padding or paddling coming towards you





Short Upper-arm and Shoulderblade

  • This dog has a short but well angled upper arm and a shoulderblade which is shorter and more upright.
  • Because his shouldblade is shorter and more upright and his upper arm is angled correctly, his neck has wrinkles where his withers meet his topline.
  • He may also be wider across this area as the shouldblade has lost it "tent effect"
  • Note here the lack of flow of neck into the withers!
  • His rear is strong and well angulated so this dog will also lift his front feet (padding) to compensate.
Lacking angulation front and rear

  • This dog also has a short upper arm, and his shoulder blade is even more upright.
  • His rear angulation is also a little straighter but it balances his front.
  • This dog will fool a lot of inexperienced judges as his lack of angulation front and rear allows the dog to track fairly true, coming and going.
  • Because his shouldblade is further up his neck there is an abrupt angle where the neck meets the withers and a longer back.
  • Side movement will show that he does not reach out in front, nor drive as much as a dog with correct angulation.
  • Note the lack of "flow" from neck into withers





Upright shoulders and straight rear rear

  • This dog's shoulderblade and upper arm are shorter and straighter.
  • This dog is first thigh is strong but his angles are straight.
  • He lacks length of pelvis therefor has no stern behind his tail
  • This dog will track fairly true, coming and going because he will lack extension front and rear.
  • When viewed from the side you will see he does not cover ground because of his angulation
Well angled shoulders and straight rear

  • This dog's shoulderblade and upper arm are are correct
  • His rear is very straight and he is out of balance.
  • He lacks length of pelvis therefor has no stern behind his tail
  • He he will have no drive from behind
  • This dog will lift his legs high (rotary action) in the rear when moving to compensate for his good reach in front to allow the timing to synchronize.





Long and wrong!

  • This dog is upright in shoulder, has a short upper arm, long back, long loin and weak rear quarters.
  • He drops away behind the tail (short pelvis).
  • He also lacks width of first and second thigh.
  • As his poor front is in balance with his poor rear and his back is longer he may look to be covering ground, but it will be just an illusion.
Lots of problems

  • This dog looks to have a short back but with a short ribcage - "Herring-Gutted"
  • He is too tucked-up and weak in loin.
  • Lack of front angulation will give him limited front extension
  • Because of his steep croup this dog will move his rear more under himself with a droop to his rear and lack any rear drive.
Continued > >          


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| Home | Judging Type | History & Purpose | Temperament | Colour | The Side View | From the Front | The Head |
| More Heads | The Body | From the Rear | Movement | Standards | Anatomy | Famous Sires | Photo Gallery | Links |
| Differences Around the World | Body Style Comparisions | Beautiful Heads | Eye Shape | The Skull Shape | Optical Illusions |
| How Structure affects Movement | Choosing a Puppy | Boxer Books | Contact Me |


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